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Posts from the ‘Good and Green’ Category

5
Jun

Extra value options

We are trying to make our fresh produce as affordable as possible for our customers. As such we are offering a couple of options this year to give extra value. The choices to buy this year are:

1. Drop-in – for customers who like to see the quality and pick their own items from our market display.

2. Preorder – with this system you can order individual items from the available produce list for the week. This will be ready for you to collect on Friday afternoon, up to 7pm.

3. Mixed box – For customers who would like extra value and use a broad range of vegetables we can make up a selection from the produce available and will include 15% extra produce FREE. This can be to the value of 15, 20 or 25 euro. It will always have a mix of greens, root veg, herbs and whatever is ready to harvest.

If you would be interested in joining a CSA scheme (community supported agriculture) please contact us to discuss. If we have enough interest we are considering introducing a pilot scheme.

5
Jun

Opening in 2013

Our farm shop is now open for summer. Opening times – every Friday 12pm-5pm. See the list posted under ‘this week’s produce’ for a week by week update (updated every Thurs). Drop-in customers are welcome. For preorders please send a list to Elaine via the website, or to elainegoodandgreen@gmail.com/087 6187908. Orders need to be sent on Thursday night for Friday preparation please.
We have a new patio area overlooking Lough Derg and our vegetable garden for anyone with time to sit and enjoy the view.

5
Jun

Local food is the way to go!

Local food is an essential element of any community’s independence, economic success and health of its members by having access to food at peak freshness. Health problems such as obesity, diabetes and cancer all have direct links to food quality.
It is my firm belief that small food producers who care about the food that they are growing, rearing or making are the businesses who can offer the best quality, nutritional and ultimately food value to their customers.
At Good & Green our business may be small, but the idea behind it, of supplying chemical free food from a number of growers and food producers has important effects. Our customers can access excellent quality food, whilst several small food industries are supported. In addition, our environmental impact aims to be positive, with minimum transporting of food, and produce grown with only organically approved methods.
Local food really is the way to go – look for it!

14
Nov

Hardwood cutting boards – natural edged

John has been developing a range of natural edged cutting boards from hardwoods such as apple, pear, elm, spalted beech. They come in a range of sizes from cheese boards to large kitchen boards of approx 60 x 40cm.

The style and finish are natural and aim to retain the character and features of the wood. Most are approx 20 – 30mm thick and are very practical for use in the kitchen. Contact John on 087 2273299 for enquiries.

25
Sep

Our youtube video – summer 2012

Thanks a million to Evan, our nephew, who is 14 years old and made the youtube video on the website this summer. Evan came to help us and to learn about growing and running a small farm over the summer holidays. He took photos and made up this video to show some of what we do. It is lovely to see what a great job he did on putting these images together into the presentation. Thanks Evan! I should have written this sooner – but during the summer my day is about 5 hours shorter than I need! It is only as autumn draws in that there are chances to give the website some attention.

18
Sep

Autumn update 2012 – back to school

Good & Green – autumn 2012 update

There is a slow down in the garden now as the daylight hours get shorter and we are in the midst of changing over from summer to winter crops in the tunnels. New winter salad, salad rocket and coriander are in the ground and doing well. Our tomatoes and cucumbers are still cropping well, but basil and French beans are coming to an end for this year.

For the months to the year end we hope to have a good selection of greens, herbs and salads and have enough potatoes, onions and leeks for the next couple of months. However, the growth from November on is always much slower, so quantities of produce will reduce in line with the season.

In other news, I have recently been offered a place on the first MSc course in Organic Horticulture run in Ireland. It is a fulltime course for one year run by UCC. We hope it will help us to improve our growing practice and to help us to better develop our farm and business over the coming years.

This will mean that I have to travel to and from Cork and study for the year. As a result our weekly order system may have to change as the course goes along. For the time being we will continue to post the produce list as usual on the website, but it is likely that the selection will be reduced for the coming winter.

We will also supply some produce to Supervalu, to be delivered by midday every Friday.

Thank you for all the orders we have had up to now – I hope that this training will mean that we can offer even better produce and service in the future.

8
May

Chilean coriander salsa – Pebre

This recipe was recommended to me by a customer – thanks Margaret. It is delicious as a dip for tortilla chips or crusty bread or served on baked potato, with salad, cold meats or pasta. You can make it as spicy or mild as you like.

Pebre – Chilean coriander salsa
• 1 medium minced onion (or 3 scallions)
• 1 large handful of finely chopped
fresh coriander (approx 100g)
• 4 medium tomatoes, chopped
• 2 tablespoons tabasco sauce or chopped dried chilli
• 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
• 1 tablespoon white vinegar
• 1 tablespoon fresh lime juice (or lemon)
• 2 garlic cloves (pressed or minced)
• salt (to taste)
• pepper (to taste)

Read more: http://www.food.com/recipe/salsa-de-cilantro-pebre-169978#ixzz1tFuhSLTw

15
Mar

Winter Vegetable Gratin

From: “Long Nights and Log Fires,” Ryland, Peters & Small 2009.

Serves 6

200 g celeriac, peeled and cut into 3-cm pieces
1 carrot, peeled and cut into rounds
1 parsnip, peeled and cut into semi-circles
1 small swede, peeled and cut into chunks
2 potatoes, cut into 3-cm pieces
250 ml single cream
1 garlic clove, crushed
1 teaspoon mustard powder
50 g fresh rye or brown breadcrumbs
2 tablespoons finely grated parmesan cheese
2 teaspoons marjoram leaves
25 g butter, melted
Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper

A shallow ovenproof dish, buttered

Preheat the oven to 180°C (Gas 4).

Bring a large saucepan of lightly salted water to a boil. Add the celeriac, carrot, parsnip, swede, and potatoes. Cook for 10 minutes, drain well, and transfer to a large bowl.

Put the cream, garlic, and mustard powder in a small saucepan and set over medium heat. Cook, stirring constantly, for about 10 minutes until the mixture is thick and coats the back of a spoon. Season to taste and pour over the vegetables. Spoon the vegetables into the prepared baking dish.

Put the breadcrumbs, parmesan, and marjoram in a bowl and mix to combine. Sprinkle the breadcrumb mixture over the vegetables and drizzle melted butter over the top.

Cook in the preheated oven for about 40 minutes, until the breadcrumbs are golden and the mixture around the edge of the baking dish has formed a golden crust. Serve warm, not hot, as a vegetarian main dish or as a side dish with any roast meat.

6
Mar

Trio of Vegetable Dips

Trio of Vegetable Dips
From: “Long Nights and Log Fires,” Ryland, Peters & Small 2009.

Choose one, two, or all three and serve with your favorite crackers or toasts. Serves 6-8.

Roasted Parsnip and Garlic Dip

25 g chilled butter, cubed
90 ml double cream
½ teaspoon sea salt
¼ teaspoon white pepper
500 g parsnips, peeled and sliced
1 garlic bulb, cut in half

Preheat oven to 180°C (Gas 4). Lightly butter a small baking dish. Put the cream in a bowl and add the salt and pepper. Put the parsnips in the dish with the garlic. Pour the cream over the top, cover with foil, and cook in the preheated oven for 45 minutes. Remove the garlic and let cool. When cool enough to handle, squeeze the garlic directly into the bowl of a blender and discard the skin. Add the remaining ingredients and process until smooth. Transfer to a dish and cover until ready to serve.

Beetroot and Caraway Dip

3 medium beetroots, uncooked
1 tablespoon horseradish sauce
90 g sour cream
1 teaspoon caraway seeds
Sea salt and white pepper

Put the beetroots in a large saucepan and cover with cold water. Bring to the boil and let boil for 45-50 minutes, until tender and easily pierced with a skewer. Drain and let cool. When cool enough to handle, peel and discard the skins. Roughly chop and put in a blender with the other ingredients and process until smooth. Season to taste, transfer to a dish and cover until ready to serve.

Spiced Carrot Dip

250 ml vegetable stock
4 medium carrots, chopped
2 tablespoons light olive oil
1 small red onion, chopped
2 garlic cloves, chopped
1 large red chilli, chopped
1 teasppon fenugreek seeds
1teaspoon ground cumin
Sea salt and white pepper

Put the stock in a saucepan, add the carrots, oil, onion, and garlic and bring to the boil. Reduce the heat to low and simmer for 15-20 minutes, until almost all the liquid has evaporated and the carrots are soft. Add the chilli, fenugreek, and cumin and cook for 2 minutes. Put in a blender and process until blended but with a rough texture. Season to taste, transfer to a dish and cover until ready to serve.

1
Mar

Carrot, apple & orange coleslaw

This is a fruity version of the traditional coleslaw. Great for children and a nice start to Spring. Taken from ’5 a day fruit & veg book’ from Hermes House.

Ingredients:
500g carrots, finely grated
2 eating apples,
1 tbsp lemon juice
1 large orange
Dressing:
3 tbsp olive oil
4 tbsp sunflower oil
1 garlic clove crushed
4 tbsp natural yoghurt
1 tbpsp chopped fresh herbs – parsley, chives, dill
Salt & freshly ground black pepper

1. Put the carrots in a large serving bowl. Quarter the apples, remove the core, then slice thinly. Sprinkle with the lemon juice to stop discolouration then add to the carrots.

2. Using a sharp knife, remove the peel and pith from the orange and then separate into segments.

3. To make the dressing, place all the ingredients in a jar with a tight fitting lid and shake vigorously to emulsify.

4. Just before serving pour the dressing over the salad and toss together well.